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On cabbage, pie and time…

I don’t know how time passes so quickly, but it does. One minute, I’m looking over the Seine, the next I’m daydreaming over a pot of wilting cabbage. I realize it’s not nearly as romantic, and totally unrelated, however that’s where I found myself this past week, trying to maintain a slow(er) pace as I dutifully prepared a batch of Marcella Hazan’s Rice and Smothered Cabbage Soup.

The dish exceeded my expectations such that I had to make it twice. I also managed to produce a batch of dulce de leche, since I knew I’d be spending a couple of hours at home. 
But back to Paris…

Sacré Cœur!

It couldn’t have been a more perfect week. Spring in full effect, brightly-colored flowers demanding my attention, giant blushing cherry blossoms, the freshness that comes after a good Spring rain. Oh! It was lovely.
It began a little like this, with my constant peppering of questions such as “What are we supposed to do today? What’s on the Excel spreadsheet?! What time are we supposed to be at the Grand Palais? If we take time here, we will miss…”
The expectations we’d made, along with our rigid itinerary devolved, quickly becoming an inside joke as we relaxed and settled into full vacation mode.
La fontaine Médicis

La fontaine Médicis

the Seine

the Seine

Without a rigid agenda, we were free to wander and really experience the city. We peeked into galleries and boutiques, quirky private museums and of course, lots of specialty food and tea shops.
Clockwise, top right: chilled cream of fennel soup from L'epi Dupin, gorgeous heart-shaped macaron's from Laduree, duck foie gras with fig compote from Le Comptoir du Relais

Clockwise, top right: chilled cream of fennel soup from L’epi Dupin, gorgeous heart-shaped macaron’s from Laduree, duck foie gras with fig compote from Le Comptoir du Relais

At one point, I was banned from lugging anything else home. We’d been trying to avoid checking luggage, and as it were, were ushered through with just a bit over the weight maximum and a handbag bursting with chocolates and other treats.
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Birthplace of the macaron.

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E. Dehillerin, where I spent a good two hours geeking out on all things kitchen.

 

My heart lies in the kitchen, nestled into a good pastry. And so at the request of a certain young lady and after an intense day at work, I spent the bulk of an evening making an apple almond crostata that is likely one of my most favorite pastries yet.
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I’m fairly adept at making pie crust and had intentioned to make a straightforward, simple dough, when a bit of cornmeal in the cupboard caught my eye. I recalled a blueberry pie with cornmeal crust that I’d made over the Summer; the rustic crunch of cornmeal strewn throughout buttery pastry…yet I wanted to make something more than pie; I wanted to make something serious, a pie that wouldn’t crumble or yield too much when pierced with a knife.
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Front: Apple and Almond Crostata with a Cornmeal Crust top left: apple tart bottom right: apple custard

A layer of frangipane (almond cream) soaked up all of the juices as it snuggled up with each apple slice; providing a cake-like consistency. Leftover odds and ends were folded into a free-form pastry, and the extra egg was poured into a sort of apple custard. I’m so glad this crostata was destined for sharing, otherwise I’d have finished the whole thing off in a few days, unapologetically.
The crostata comes together rather quickly.
Wait a minute - scratch that.
This is going to keep you home for a few hours, however once the nutty aroma of butter and pastry, notes of cinnamon and apple hit your nostrils, you’ll realize it was totally worth it (and probably get a bit of laundry done while you wait).
Enjoy, and much love,
J
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Apple and Almond Crostata with a Cornmeal Crust
*This pie will keep for 1-2 days on the counter, or 3-4 days in the refrigerator, if it lasts that long
For the crust:
2 1/2 cups of flour
1/2 cup cornmeal
3/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
2 eggs
10 tbsp butter
1/4 c sugar
1 tsp lemon zest
Ice water (as needed)
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Almond Filling:
2/3 c almond meal (I used blanched almonds, ground finely in a coffee grinder)
1/4 c sugar
1 egg
2 tbsp butter, softened
1 tbsp flour
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp each vanilla and almond extract
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Apple filling
5 apples, such as granny smith, honey crisp or pink lady or a combination, peeled, cored and sliced into 1/3-inch wedges
3 tbsp sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
1 teaspoon lemon zest
juice of one-half lemon
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1 beaten egg, and 1 tbsp Demerara or other coarse sugar, for finishing
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Preheat oven to 350 degrees fahrenheit.
Brush insides of a 9-inch springform pan with butter using a pastry brush, or paper towel, if necessary. Set aside.
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Using a food processor, pulse together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, and salt.
Butter and pulse a few times until the mixture resembles small peas.
Add eggs, one at a time, giving a few quick pulses to combine.
Pulse another 15-20 seconds until the mixture just starts to come together, adding water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if needed.
Wrap in plastic or parchment and allow dough to rest in the refrigerator for at least an hour.
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While dough is resting, prepare almond paste. Mix all ingredients together using a food processor, stand mixer, or whisk; if the butter is soft enough, it should be easily combined by hand. Set aside.
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Sift together the dry ingredients; toss with sliced apples and give it a squeeze of lemon juice. Allow to sit for ~15-30 minutes, tossing occasionally.
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Divide dough into roughly 1/3 and 2/3 portions; you’ll want slightly more dough for the base than the top.
Roll dough into a large disk ~1-1 1/2 inch wider than the diameter of the pan.
Tuck dough into pan, inching up the sides.
Spread almond filling into base, then arrange apples in concentric patterns, keeping them somewhat close together.
Roll out remaining dough to ~1/4 inch thickness and cut into 1/2-inch-wide strips.
Cover apples with remaining dough in a lattice-type arrangement (you can find instructional how-to’s here).
Brush pastry with beaten egg, then adorn with a bit of coarse sugar.
Bake for ~1 hour, until golden and bubbling.
Remove from oven; let cool on wire rack for ~15 minutes before removing sides of pan. Allow to cool for at least 1/2 hour.
Serve either warm, or at room temperature.

Virtue by Way of Cake.

My breakfast lately has consisted of a noble mix of hemp, chia, pumpkin seeds and slivered almonds embedded in yogurt and almond milk, with currants, wild lingonberries and just the slightest kiss of honey.
Chia Pudding
I like to follow it up with a handful of Girl Scout cookies. What can I say?
Moving on.
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This past week has left me with little enthusiasm for cooking, however last night found me wanting to bake.
I recalled my friend Lisa serving up a sliver of her grapefruit olive oil cake some time ago. I’d begged her for the recipe, to which she said nothing, then several days later, I received a link to the blog where she’d discovered it. You can find it, here.
Grapefruit and Fennel Olive Oil Cake with Citrus Glaze

Grapefruit and Fennel Olive Oil Cake with Citrus Glaze

So with a ripe grapefruit already on hand, my mind went immediately to this cake. I’ve made it several times, with little tweaks here and there. This time around, I added a whiff of fennel seed to perfume the cake, not overpowering; rather like a silent partner, giving a little boost from behind the curtain.
The glaze evolved from other items on hand, some candied citrus peel, sugar and sweet-tart Meyer lemon juice.
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This is the kind of cake can easily be justified as breakfast with a healthy dollop of Greek yogurt, goes well with afternoon tea, or any other time when the need for a bit of sweetness strikes.
Grapefruit and Fennel Olive Oil Cake
Enjoy, and much love.
J
Grapefruit olive oil cake with Fennel seeds and Meyer Lemon Glaze
Adapted from Sarah’s recipe for Olive Oil Cake at The Yellow House blog (link)
Ingredients:
For the cake:
1 c granulated sugar
3/4 tsp fennel seed (whole, not ground)
1 heaping tsp grapefruit zest
juice of 1 grapefruit (~1/2 cup)
1/3 cup Greek yogurt
3 eggs
2/3 c olive oil
1 c whole wheat flour
3/4 c all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp each baking soda and sea salt
For the glaze:
1/2 c Meyer lemon juice
1/4 cup each brown and granulated sugars
2 tbsp candied citrus peel (optional)
Method:
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Brush inside of a bundt or rectangular pan, ~9×5 inches; set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, combine dry ingredients; set aside.
  4. Set aside a small bowl and, using hands, rub zest and fennel seeds into sugar until fragrant.
  5. Whisk into sugar the eggs, juice, yogurt and olive oil until well-combined
  6. Pour wet ingredients into dry; quickly whisk together until smooth; about 30 seconds
  7. Bake for ~45 minutes, rotating halfway through. Cake is done when a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  8. Let cool for ~5 minutes in pan, then invert onto serving plate.
While cake is baking, prepare glaze:
  1. Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan.
  2. Heat over medium-high, without stirring, until boiling.
  3. Allow to boil for ~60 seconds; remove from heat.
  4.  Spoon glaze over top of cake, and allow to cool completely before serving.

Magic Beans.

Last week, I discovered that I have been treating my body terribly. It was rebelling in ways I’d rather not mention. Needless to say, I needed a redirect. The inextricable link between mind and body is a beautiful thing, and I’m fortunate that I’m able call that in from time to time, giving attention and respect to the remarkable gift of intuition.
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I found myself craving simple clean food comfort food; beans rice, warming spices. I also felt the need to reel in my sweet tooth a bit. There’s an insatiable hunger that, like a switch at the ready, activates as soon a I put a bit of pastry, a piece of candy or chocolate or some other sweet in my mouth.
It works for a while.
Until it doesn’t.
It’s manageable when other areas of my life are in balance. For example, when I’m running regularly, when I’m in a good place emotionally, mentally, spiritually. However, put a nick in any one of those precious spindles and I without fail dive wholeheartedly into a vat of sugar.
Not to mention, my skin was looking terrible, undoubtedly influenced by a dry winter and lack of good healthy fats in my diet. And so this past week I’ve been eating more oily fish, avocados and eggs, steering clear of bread and sweets.
For now.
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I’d been dreaming of making mujadarrah, a simple dish with lentils, rice and onion when I’d discovered Melissa Clark’s post on The How and Why of Dal (you can find the link, here)
It couldn’t have been more appropriately timed. Mujadarra is a typical dish that I go for, as is dal, however the marriage of rice and beans in kichri was perfect, so soothing, nourishing, a blanket for my tummy. I made a few adaptations based on what I had available in the pantry.
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I’d also felt the need to rebalance my gut with some healthy bacteria, so I whipped up some radish and beet pickles.
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And then there was the hummus: I know that hummus is rather ubiquitous, however I’d been pondering making some spicy fried chickpeas and became curious as to how they might work in a puree. The blistered skin of the chickpeas, the aromatic scent of cumin as it popped away in hot cast iron met well with the astringency of the tahini and bright flavor of lemon. I added a pinch of cayenne and toasted garlic to give it a little kick.
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As I nibble on dried persimmon and tap away at the keyboard, I’m more than certain I’ll be knocking on Pastry’s door again soon. However, for now I’ll adhere to a bit of Ayurvedic wisdom and give my body what it needs.
For now.
Enjoy, and much love,
J
Spiced Lentils with Rice (adapted from Melissa Clark’s Kichri with Massour Dal )
Note: I prefer the smaller French lentils for their distinctive texture, however brown will work. Red lentils are great in dal, and would produce a slightly creamier consistency when cooked with the rice in this dish). Kichri is highly adaptable and can incorporate other vegetables, such as tomatoes, potatoes, okra and the like. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil and a generous dollop of yogurt and toasted cumin seeds.
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Ingredients:
1 c. dried lentils (I prefer the smaller French lentils, however brown will work)
2 c. basmati rice
1/2 tsp cumin seed
4-5 cardamom pods
1 cinnamon stick
1/4 tsp peppercorns
1/2 tsp chili flakes
2 tbsp ghee, or olive oil
1 cup finely chopped onion
sea salt
Rinse rice and lentils well; soak the rice and lentils for at least an hour. Drain and rinse again.
Set a skillet over medium heat and add ghee or olive oil.
Add remaining spices and cook until fragrant; ~2-3 minutes. Fold in chopped onion and cook for another 2-3 minutes.
Combine spices with lentils and rice in a large pot with 4 cups of water, along with 1 tsp salt.
Bring to a boil and then lower heat to a simmer for ~20 minutes (less, if using red lentils).
Remove from heat and let stand for ~10 minutes, then aerate with a spatula to evenly distribute the flavors and serve.
Toasted Hummus
Note: I’m a fair-weather fan when it comes to garlic, however heating the garlic with the chickpeas tames it a bit and works well with the other smoky flavors in the spread.
 

Ingredients

1.5 c garbanzo beans, cooked, rinsed and patted dry
1 tsp cumin seed
1-22 garlic cloves, peeled
1/4 cup tahini
juice of 1/2 lemon
1/4 c water
Pinch of cayenne
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp olive oil
Method:
Place a large skillet on moderate heat. Add olive oil. When olive oil starts to shimmer, add the chickpeas and cumin. Shake pan occasionally and cook until chickpeas are blistered and lightly browned; about 7-9 minutes. Remove pan from heat and allow beans to cool slightly.
In a food processor, combine all ingredients except olive oil and pulse to combine, scraping sides down as necessary. While the machine is running, slowly add olive oil. Taste; season with additional salt and lemon juice as indicated.
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On Quick Eats, Part II

…and the cauliflower obsession continues. I cannot seem to leave the market without a head of cauliflower in my basket these days – sincerely. My most favorite method of preparation is to roast until golden and nutty and serve alongside some dal and pita. This afternoon, however, I was thumbing through my Jerusalem cookbook when a lovely recipe for cauliflower salad caught my eye. A few minor variations and voilà!
Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Pomegranate Molasses

Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Pomegranate Molasses

It’s a relatively straight-forward recipe that comes together quickly, and can easily be made more substantial with a bit of grated, hard-boiled egg, or served alongside some dal or a filet of roast salmon.
Enjoy, and much love.
J
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Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Pomegranate Molasses
 
Ingredients:
1 head cauliflower; trimmed and cut into bite-sized pieces
2 tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
coarse sea salt and pepper
1/3 c parsley leaves (I prefer Italian flat-leaf)
1/2 c chopped toasted almonds
sm. handful chopped dried cherries or 1/4 c pomegranate arils (seeds)
1/4 tsp flaked red chili
2 tbsp pomegranate molasses
1 tsp lemon juice
salt and pepper
Method:
Preheat oven to 400. Toss cauliflower with olive oil, nutmeg, cinnamon and a pinch of salt and pepper.
Roast for ~40 minutes or lightly charred, stirring about halfway through.
Allow to cool slightly and then combine with remaining ingredients.
Taste and season with salt and pepper.
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Proofed.

There was a time when I made bread often. My daughter was a mere tot, and I found myself spending a lot of time in the kitchen. Initially, I’d started with simple doughs, such as pizza or focaccia, then graduated to more dense, hearty sandwich breads and rolls. My trusted Kitchen Aid mixer would start to fatigue from several minutes of hard labor, however I enjoyed its convenience and reduction of hands-on time. At some point, I transitioned to kneading by hand, and developed a love for the tactile communion with flour, yeast and water . I had a physical sense of when the dough was properly kneaded. I’d become lost in the activity as the minutes sped past with little awareness other than what I was feeling beneath and between my fingers.
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The elements of bread making are finding their way back into my life, and not without coincidence. Most mornings, I spend time reflecting and meditating to gain a bit of ground before getting captured by the day’s activities. There is a book I refer to frequently, Heal Thy Self: Lessons on Mindfulness in Medicine, by Saki Santorelli. A passage I read recently spoke to the Author’s love of baking, and how baking can be both humbling and liberating. It made me think of the contrasting simplicity and attention that bread making requires. He likens the bakery to a crucible, “hot, containing, pressurized outwardly; hot, containing, pressurized inwardly”. A timely piece, as I find myself moving with elements that are somewhat beyond my control. Shortly thereafter, I was sifting through the NYT and discovered Martha Rose Schulman’s recipe for a yeasted loaf with apples.
You can find the link, here.
Honeyed Pear and Walnut Bread

Evolution: Honeyed Pear and Walnut Bread

And so,I found myself with a yearning to make bread. The sweetness of whole grain loaf, heady, yeast-y and studded with apples was the catalyst, however I wanted to provide influence in my own creative way. I dreamt up crunchy bosc pears, contrasted with bitter walnut and sweet honey. I gave the dough plenty of time to develop flavor by starting with a pre-ferment, or sponge.
And I waited.
And I shaped.
And I coaxed.
And I waited a bit longer.
Until finally the dough emerged a golden crown of pure heaven.
Honeyed Pear and Walnut Bread
This bread is delicious simply toasted and spread with fresh cheese and honey. It can also pair nicely with prosciutto and fontina or gorgonzola.
Enjoy, and much love.
J
 
Honeyed Pear and Walnut Bread
Ingredients:
1 c rye four
1.5-2 c whole wheat flour
1.5 c white flour
1 tsp salt
1/4 c honey
1 1/4 c warm water
1 packet (2.5 tsp) yeast
2 tbsp butter; room temp
1 c walnuts
1 1/4-1/2 c bosc pear, chopped
Method:
  1. Make a sponge: combine water, yeast honey and white flour in a large bowl. stir to combine, then cover with a damp towel and let rest for ~1 hour or so.
  2. Add rye flour, walnuts, butter, salt and 1 cup of the whole wheat flour to sponge; stir and/or knead down, adding additional flour as necessary until the mixture is no longer sticky. Turn onto a flat surface and knead for several minutes, until the dough becomes smooth and elastic.
  3. Set in an oiled bowl, cover with damp towel or plastic wrap and allow to rise for about ~1-1.5 hours. I like to pop it in the oven with the pilot light; it sets a nice ambient temperature for coaxing the fermentation into gear.
  4. Deflate dough by punching down; fold in chopped pears. Knead into a round and then return to a neutral spot to rest again until doubled in size; ~2 hours.
  5. Deflate dough again and shape into a neat round and set on parchment or floured kitchen towel for another 1.5-2 hours until dough redoubles in size.
  6. As dough is entering the final rise, adjust oven rack and set a pizza stone or cast iron skillet in the center. Turn heat to 450 degrees and allow stone or skillet heat for ~40 minutes.
  7. Turn dough onto skillet/stone; slash decoratively, brush with milk and place in oven. Spritz oven with a bit of water to create a steam environment.
  8. In 15 minutes, spritz again and turn heat to 400 degrees.
  9. Bake for a further 25 minutes, until deep golden brown. Remove from oven and tap bottom of round; it’ll sound hollow if it is done.
  10. Wait (patiently!) for a good 30 minutes as dough cools on rack before slicing.
  11. Store, wrapped in cloth or a paper bag on counter for 1-2 days. To preserve some of the bread for later, simply bundle in layers of plastic wrap and store in the freezer.
Brittle

Snow Day.

Last night, snow fell in Seattle. It was rather beautiful. We watched it fall precipitously as we dined on tender rabbit ragu, gnocchi with wild mushrooms, seafood paella, lamb meatballs with squash risotto, brussels sprouts with toasted hazelnuts. And while there was maybe a walnut-sized amount of space left in my belly, I couldn’t leave without sampling the chocolate creme brulee (thanks for the encouragement, Lauren!). It was an intimate night out with family at Olivar’s restaurant, full of laughter and good conversation.
As we made our way back to the car, it was clear that the hills weren’t worth navigating, so we abandoned our vehicle and took a (very) brisk walk home.
Not to worry; by morning the roads had been well-sanded and when we returned, the only damage was a hefty pile of snow, into which someone had sweetly etched a heart. I smiled as I glanced back through the rear window.
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And now I find myself taking advantage of the elements and staying indoors to rest, relax and get creative.
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While I have a seemingly insatiable sweet tooth, I also crave foods of the more “nutritious” variety. Salty sardines on toast, chia pudding with almond milk and berries, kale smoothies, fresh nuts and seeds. Working in the field of Nutrition, I see diet fads come and go, and while I’ve had my own history of dietary rigidity, I discovered long ago that the best relationship with food is an intuitive one. There are days when I crave a healthy dose of omega 3′s, and then there are days when I just want to eat cookies and chocolate, period.
chia pudding with berries

chia pudding with berries

And so today, folks, let’s take a look at candy-making. The circuitous path my foodie journey took this morning was an evolution of crunchy, salty, sweet, nutty and caramel-y goodness. A trifecta of pistachio, pignolia and pumpkin seeds, bathed in brittle vanilla toffee and glistening with flaky Maldon sea salt. A snack that had just the right amount of everything to keep me nibbling as I waited for the slowly roasting marinated turkey to make it’s way to my dinner plate.
Enjoy, and much love,
J
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Pine Nut, Pistachio and Pumpkin Seed Brittle
Note: This brittle comes together in a snap (pun intended), however it requires mindful presence and having all ingredients prepped and ready to add at the proper interval. A candy thermometer is requisite.
Adapted from Alison Roman’s Salted Pistachio Brittle, http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/salted-pistachio-brittle
Ingredients:
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1 cup cane sugar
3 Tbsp water
1/2 c salted pistachios
1/4 cup each pumpkin seeds and pignolias (aka: pine nuts); toasted
Seeds from 1 vanilla bean
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
3/4 tsp baking soda
Flaked sea salt, such as Maldon
Method:
1. Line a sheet pan with parchment and spray lightly with nonstick spray.
2. Combine water, sugar and syrup in a 2-3 quart pan over medium heat. Stir until sugar has dissolved, then increase heat to high and affix candy thermometer.
3. Once temperature has reached 290° (~3-4 minutes), add nuts, vanilla seeds, salt and butter.
4. Monitor until heat reaches 300°, then remove from heat and sprinkle with baking soda. The mixture will bubble up and increase in volume. Pour immediately onto prepared sheet pan and sprinkle with salt.
5. Allow to cool completely, then break into pieces. Store in an airtight container.

Brittle

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Different parts of a whole.

This happened in Seattle. Businesses closed. City streets littered with detritus from last night’s fireworks. I’ve never seen this much enthusiasm in our city. It was nearly impossible not to get caught up in the groundswell.
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Taking a different direction, literally.
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Once in a while, I force myself to take a different path. It’s easy to get comfortable in the familiar, however a simple change in direction, a re-route, if you will, yields new discoveries. While I’m referring to running, the benefit of applying this metaphor to the rest of life’s journey is not lost on me.
As I begrudgingly made my way along the trail, there were trees I’d never noticed before. Fat robins perched on thin branches. I heard the bubbling brook as it meandered downstream and I embraced the crisp in the air.
bubbling brook
And I dreamt of spring.
And citrus.
I can’t seem to veer away from it. A messager du printemps, Spring is calling me; fresh, clean and bright. The invitation to wake up after Winter slumber; the hint of sweetness. Naturally, my mind wandered to food, or specifically, lemon curd. When I got home, I pulled The Art of Simple Food, by Alice Waters, off the shelf. I love this book; its simple design, classic and mature, with straightforward recipes and a focus on the local and seasonal. The recipes are brilliantly clear and approachable.
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Meyer Lemon Tart

Meyer Lemon Tart

I used Meyer lemons for the juice, and made a luxurious shortbread pastry to showcase the silky custard. Wasting nothing, I made merengue with the leftover whites. I got a bit fancy by adding chopped chocolate and pistachios to some, folding in sliced almonds into others.
I candied the citrus peels with the juiced fruit – the resultant citrus syrup became an impromtu cocktail and soda mixer, a quick and easy hostess gift for last night’s party.
Almond Merengue

Almond Merengue

 

Candied Citrus Peel

Candied Citrus Peel

Enjoy, and much love,
J
Meyer Lemon Tart
*note: I imagine the lemon would well with the flavor of thyme, or ginger, a relatively simple addition to the custard. Folding a bit of orange or lemon zest into the pastry adds another layer of dimension.
One 9-inch prepared tart (see link, here)
Lemon Curd (*adapted from The Art of Simple Food, by Alice Waters)
6 Meyer lemons, juiced, approximately 1/2 cup
Zest from one lemon
3 egg yolks
2 eggs
2 Tbsp milk
1/3 c sugar
1 tsp tapioca starch, or cornstarch
pinch of salt
6 tbsp unsalted butter, diced
Optional: 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves, or 1 tsp freshly grated ginger
In a medium saucepan, add whisk together all ingredients except the butter. Bring to a medium heat, and add butter. Stir constantly until thickened. As soon as custasrd is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, remove from heat, add herbs (if using) and let steep for ~10 minutes.
Pour curd into prepared crust. Bake at 375 degrees for ~15-20 minutes, until set. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely before serving*.
*For ease of serving, this tart will benefit from a brief chill in the refrigerator.